Liber 118 U.S. 394,
the hidden story of transnationals...

published archives:

citations:

  • The Myths Of Reality
    by Simon Danser
    ISBN 9781872883809

    "Paco Xander Nathan's witty take on the substance-less legal entities we call corporations and limited companies is followed by a wickedly accurate definition of their essence: 'Externalize risk and perpetuate wealth for shareholders.' … had I wanted to cloak this book in a shroud of exoticism, it could have been called Egregria et Incorporatus." (pp. 67-68)

  • The Art of Memetics
    by Wes Unruh, Edward Wilson
    ISBN 9781435771383

    "The term egregore can be used in referencing a guiding intelligence within corporations, institutions, and religions that exhibits elements of an individual entity." (p. 8)

  • Metamagical Grafitti
    by Wes Unruh

    "The physical accretions of the egregore then are the temples, structures, and iconography made manifest by and at the commission of the religion's followers. Governmental egregores are more perverse, more recent, and tend to be geographically bound. The United States is more or less run by Uncle Sam and the Goddess Columbia, when viewed from this mental attitude. The last is the corporate egregore, the youngest of all egregores, coming into its own in the United States in a federal court in 1886, when justices decreed corporations to be legal persons in their own rights, 'as they represent the property of natural persons and acts on their behalf' as Paco Xander Nathan put it." (issue #1, "The Philip K Nixon Experience", pp. 4-5)

  • Sentient Organizations: A Cryptozoological Approach
    by Laszlo Xalieri

    "One of the quirks of evolution is that not every member of any particular species has to evolve in the same way. Or at all. Because of this, we can look through the flotilla of species that still exist and see examples of aggregation at all stages that weren't so unstable as to be weeded out. We still have single-celled creatures with no concern or moderation with respect to others of their kind or their environment, many of which we classify as diseases. We have single-celled creatures that communicate chemically and cooperate toward common goals, like the microbes in our intestines that we count on for proper digestion. We have colonial organisms, like salps and corals and sponges, where every piece of the organism is basically identical. And then we have a couple of lovely slime molds. (See the transcript of Paco Nathan's talk at the Parallax View conference in Austin, TX, Oct 22, 2000.)" ("Sentient Organizations: A Cryptozoological Approach", Disinformation 2012-07-27)